strut

suomi-englanti sanakirja

strut englannista suomeksi

  1. astella ylväästi, saapastella

  2. ylväs astelu

  3. tukitanko

  1. pullistella

  2. astella ylväästi">astella ylväästi, kekkaloida, saapastella, tepastella

  3. pullistua

  4. paisuttaa, pullistaa

  5. pönkkä, tuki

  6. Substantiivi

strut englanniksi

  1. Of a peacock or other fowl: to stand or walk stiffly, with the tail erect and out.

  2. (RQ:Shakespeare Tempest)

  3. (quote-book)|chapter=The Gardens of Afrasiab|translator=Samuel Robinson|title=Persian Poetry for English Readers: Being Specimens of Six of the Greatest Classical Poets of Persia: Ferdusī, Ganjavi|Nizāmī, Shirazi|Sādī, Jelāl-ad-dīn Rūmī, Hāfiz, and Jāmī(nb...)|location=Glasgow|publisher=(...) & Son for private circulation|year=1883|section=section IV (Miscellaneous Specimens of the “Shah-Namah”)|page=93|pageurl=https://books.google.com/books?id=F7gOAAAAQAAJ&pg=PA93|oclc=504375819|passage=The pheasant strutteth about in the midst of flowers; / The turtle-dove cooeth, and the nightingale warbleth from the cypress.

  4. (quote-journal)|date=24 November 1887|year_published=19 July 1883|volume=X|issue=256|page=288|pageurl=https://books.google.com/books?id=LaZAAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA288|oclc=950942941|passage=He thought that whenne Thanksgyving came he'd looke soe payle & thynne, / He colde avoid ye usual role ye Turkye strutteth inne.|footer=(small)

  5. To walk haughtily or proudly with one's head held high.

  6. (synonyms)

    (ux)

  7. (RQ:Shakespeare Merry Wives)

  8. (quote-book)|location=London|publisher=Watson (radical)|James Watson,(nb...)|year=1850|page=191|pageurl=https://books.google.com/books?id=C1VyTMI6HGIC&pg=PA191|oclc=13135751|passage=... I trow it is enough to make a man forswear the very mother that bore him, and to wish that he had never had one, when one is cooped up in a gloomy hole like this, to watch a door within which strutteth a jackanapes too proud to speak civil to those that approach him.

  9. (quote-journal)|month=May|year=1857|volume=LXXXI|issue=CCCCXCIX (American edition, volume XLIV, number 5)|page=632|pageurl=https://books.google.com/books?id=wKNGAAAAcAAJ&pg=RA6-PT1|oclc=1042815524|passage="With Mosaic cheers unglutted, / Stood he in this vast abode; / As thou struttest, so he strutted, / As thou crowest, so he crow'd— / He the well-beloved of Hansard, / Is he kin, sweet bird, to you?" / But the valiant bantam answer'd— / "Cock-a-doodle-doodle-doo!"

  10. (quote-book)|year=1867|section=stanza 2|page=87|pageurl=https://books.google.com/books?id=arEVAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA87|oclc=16133162|passage=Hast thou nor shame, nor modesty, nor fear? / That thus thou struttest in the face of God, / Spreading thy peacock's feathers, with their gleam?

  11. (RQ:Pyle Robin Hood)

  12. (quote-journal) A London Magazine for Town and Country Readers|location=London|publisher=Bentley (publisher)|Richard Bentley & Son,(nb...); New York, N.Y.: Willmer and Rogers; Paris: Anthony Galignani|Galignani|month=September|year=1888|volume=LXXXIV|section=chapter II (A Welby Festival)|page=73|pageurl=https://books.google.com/books?id=_YcMfcXsFbgC&pg=PA73|oclc=177729571|passage=... I recognise the two Miss Boulters, the acknowledged queens of Welby society, each of whom has managed to secure a cavalier for escort; Margaret Watson flounces by with young Boulter, a stout, florid youth with an insinuating eye; Jo and Charlotte strut out together arm in arm with a funny imitation of their elders.

  13. To walk across or on (a stage or other place) haughtily or proudly.

  14. (quote-book)|year=1827|page=46|pageurl=https://books.google.com/books?id=jEZBAAAAYAAJ&pg=RA1-PA46|oclc=1125822079|passage=Taking you and your colleagues as the model of modern times, I should almost fear that the (w) of former days was as different from the John Bull of the present time, as is a broad-shouldered, fearless Highlandman from the dapper cockney who struts the Park by the side of his fellow-milliner.

  15. (quote-book)|year=1838|section=book I|pages=20–21|pageurl=https://books.google.com/books?id=OxhhAAAAcAAJ&pg=PA20|lines=63–66|oclc=559989887|passage=The frantic father struts the stage, / And swells with true sublimity of rage / Against his son, who leads a wanton life, / And scorns the offer of a dowried wife.

  16. (quote-book),(nb...)|year=1868|page=51|pageurl=https://books.google.com/books?id=6EsCAAAAQAAJ&pg=PA51|oclc=504473991|passage=Still garbed in notions wont to gird / Minds in the reign of III|George the Third, / He strutteth an embodied tameness / In a sober suit of sameness.

  17. ''Often followed by'' out: to protuberate or out due to being full or swollen; to bulge, to swell.

  18. (quote-book) Mikrokosmographia. A Description of the Body of Man.(nb...)|edition=2nd|location=London|publisher=(...) Cotes|Thomas and Richard Cotes, and are to be sold by Michael Sparke,(nb...)|year=1631|oclc=1065149683|newversion=quoted in|2ndauthor=Valerie Traub|chapter2=The (In)Significance of ‘Lesbian’ Desire in Early Modern England|editor2=(w)|title2=Queering the Renaissance|location2=Durham, N.C.; London|publisher2=(w)|year2=1994|page2=66|pageurl2=https://books.google.com/books?id=ZWGWGxI9n3MC&pg=PA66|isbn2=978-0-8223-1385-4|passage=Sometimes clitoris groweth to such a length that it hangeth without the cleft like a mans member, especially when it is fretted with the touch of the cloaths, and so strutteth and groweth to a rigiditie as doth the yarde penis of a man.

  19. (quote-book)|location=London|publisher=(...) Simon Miller,(nb...)|year=1671|section=book II|page=132|pageurl=https://books.google.com/books?id=PKtkAAAAcAAJ&pg=PA132|oclc=960105227|passage=If the right breaſt ſwell and ſtrut out the Boy is well, if it flag it is a ſign of miſcarriage, judge the ſame of the Girle by the left breaſt, when it is ſunk, or round and hard, the firſt ſignifies abortion to be near, the other health and ſafety both of the Mother and the Child.

  20. (RQ:Dryden Iliad)

  21. (quote-journal)|journal=The Transactions of the Linnean Society of London|location=London|publisher=(...) & Francis|Taylor and Francis,(nb...); and by Longmans, Green, Reader, and Dyer,(nb...)|date=1 April 1869|volume=XXVII, 1st part|page=123|pageurl=https://books.google.com/books?id=xUJFAAAAcAAJ&pg=PA123|oclc=1131684322|passage=They cut the tree where they see the bark to be fullest of liquor, and whereas they perceive it to be thinnest and strut out most. Quoting (w)'s translation of (w)'s ''History (Pliny)|Natural History'', book XII, chapter 14.

  22. ''Often followed by'' out: to cause (something) to bulge, protrude, or swell.

  23. (quote-book) J. Kinneir,(nb...), and A. Long,(nb...)|year=1746?|page=5|pageurl=https://books.google.com/books?id=bDJcAAAAQAAJ&pg=PA5|oclc=991304966|passage=He gains the glitt'ring prize, / And ſtruts the gaudy food of gazing eyes, / A thing—that oft his Footmen may deſpiſe.

  24. A step or walk done stiffly and with the head held high, often due to haughtiness or pride; affected dignity in walking.

  25. (quote-book)|month=October 6 – 1861 July 6|year=1860|year_published=1890|page=418|pageurl=https://books.google.com/books?id=djgPAAAAQAAJ&pg=PA418|column=2|oclc=12962744|passage=Putting on his hat, and thrusting both hands into the pockets of his trousers, he marched with a nonchalant strut out of the room, ...

  26. An instrument for adjusting the pleats of a ruff.

  27. A beam or rod providing support.

  28. (quote-journal)|date=26 August 1833|year_published=1 March 1834|volume=XX|issue=551|page=358|pageurl=https://books.google.com/books?id=w0k4AAAAMAAJ&pg=PA358|column=2|oclc=183222409|passage=This alteration will obviate the necessity for the injudicious iron struts which are now introduced between the backs of the columns and the face of the pilasters, and which, in a practical point of view, afford little or no advantage, except against a direct shock; and even in many such cases they have failed in that object; for in such of them as have been struck, permanent alteration of the strut has taken place, which now has the effect of holding those portions of the shaft with which they are connected out of their places.

  29. (quote-book) Gas Engine School, (w); Great Lakes, Ill.: United States Naval Training Station|month=July|year=1919|section=part 2 (Technical Course)|pages=587–588|pageurl=https://books.google.com/books?id=J6c_AAAAYAAJ&pg=PA588|oclc=42631330|passage=''Replacing and Aligining Wing-tip Float Struts.'' Loosen the brace wires and stagger wires on the wing-tip float. Remove the bolts or pins from the strut fittings, both on the float and on the wing surface; then lift the strut out. Carefully replace the strut in a like manner. This is a very simple operation but care must be taken to align the strut with the one in the rear and the one opposite.

  30. (quote-journal)|location=New York, N.Y.|publisher=Communications|The Hearst Corporation|month=January|year=1992|volume=169|issue=1|pages=72 and 74|pageurl=https://books.google.com/books?id=seMDAAAAMBAJ&pg=PA72|issn=0032-4558|oclc=868915883|passage=MacPherson struts are found attached to the front wheels of just about every front-drive car on the road and at the fronts of many rear-wheel-drive cars, as well. ... The MacPherson strut is a single unit that contains the shock absorber and coil spring. In addition, the strut acts as the upper arm in a typical suspension.

  31. An act of (l); specifically, deviation (of the spoke of a wheel) from the normal position.

  32. To brace or support (something) by a 2|strut or struts; to hold (something) in place or strengthen by a diagonal, transverse, or upright support.

  33. (quote-journal)

  34. To be attached diagonally or at a slant; also, to be bent at a sharp angle.

  35. Swelling out due to being full; bulging, protuberant, swollen.

  36. Drunk, intoxicated; fou.

  37. (antonyms)

  38. lard

  39. An object shaped as a hollow, open cone.

  40. cornet; cone; ''also'' one including the cream.

  41. ''Short for'' glasstrut.

  42. (''male or female'') ostrich