bill

suomi-englanti sanakirja

bill englannista suomeksi

  1. ohjelma, mainosjuliste, konserttiohjelma, teatteriohjelma, elokuvaohjelma, käsiohjelma

  2. laskuttaa

  3. ravintolalasku, lasku

  4. mainostaa julisteilla

  5. nokka

  6. juliste

  7. mainostaa, ilmoittaa

  8. seteli

  9. mainoslehtinen

  10. lakialoite, lakiesitys, lakiehdotus

  11. sirppi

  12. lippa

  1. hilpari

  2. vesuri

  3. hilparimies

  4. kynsi

  5. hakata

  6. nokka

  7. kuhertaa

  8. luettelo

  9. julistus

  10. lakiehdotus, lakiesitys

  11. kanne

  12. lasku

  13. juliste

  14. vekseli

  15. laskuttaa

  16. Substantiivi

bill englanniksi

  1. Any of various bladed or pointed hand weapons, originally designating an Anglo-Saxon sword, and later a weapon of infantry, especially in the 14th and 15th centuries, commonly consisting of a broad, heavy, double-edged, hook-shaped blade, with a short pike at the back and another at the top, attached to the end of a long staff.

  2. (syn)

  3. 1786, Francis Grose, ''A Treatise on Ancient Armour and Weapons''.

  4. In the British Museum there is an entry of a warrant, granted to Nicholas Spicer, authorising him to impress smiths for making two thousand Welch bills or glaives.
  5. (RQ:Macaulay History of England)

  6. France had no infantry that dared to face the English bows and bills.
  7. A cutting instrument, with hook-shaped point, and fitted with a handle, used in pruning, etc.; a billhook.

  8. Somebody armed with a bill; a billman.

  9. A pickaxe, or mattock.

  10. The extremity of the arm of an anchor; the point of or beyond the fluke (also called the peak).

  11. To dig, chop, etc., with a bill.

  12. The beak of a bird, especially when small or flattish; sometimes also used with reference to a platypus, turtle, or other animal.

  13. 1595, (w), ''(w)'', Act III, Scene I, line 125.

  14. The woosel cock so black of hue, With orange-tawny bill, The throstle with his note so true, The wren with little quill...
  15. (quote-journal)| date=23 December 2014| passage=(..) The flesh the mistletoe berry is sticky, and forms strings and ribbons between my thumb and forefinger. For the mistletoe, this viscous goop – and by the way, viscous comes to English from viscum – is crucial. The stickiness means that, after eating the berries, birds often regurgitate the seeds and then wipe their bills on twigs – leading to the seeds' getting glued to the tree, where they can germinate and begin the cycle anew.

  16. A beak-like projection, especially a promontory.

  17. Of a cap or hat: the brim or peak, serving as a shade to keep sun off the face and out of the eyes.

  18. to peck

  19. to stroke bill against bill, with reference to doves; to caress in fondness

  20. (RQ:Shakespeare As You Like It)

  21. As the ox hath his bow, sir, the horse his curb and the falcon her bells, so man hath his desires; and as pigeons bill, so wedlock would be nibbling.
  22. A written list or inventory. (''Now obsolete except in specific senses or set phrases; of lading, of goods, etc.'')

  23. A document, originally sealed; a formal statement or official memorandum. (''Now obsolete except with certain qualifying words; of health, of sale etc.'')

  24. (senseid) A draft of a law, presented to a legislature for enactment; a proposed or projected law.

  25. 1600, (w), ''(w)'', Act II, Scene I, line 28.

  26. Why, I'll exhibit a bill in the parliament for the putting down of men.
  27. (quote-journal)| title=We mustn't overreact to North Korea boys' toys| volume=188| issue=2| page=23| magazine=Guardian Weekly|The Guardian Weekly| url=http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2012/dec/14/north-korea-boys-toys-threat-reaction| passage=David Cameron insists that his latest communications data bill is “vital to counter terrorism”. Yet terror is mayhem. It is no threat to freedom. That threat is from counter-terror, from ministers capitulating to securocrats.

  28. A declaration made in writing, stating some wrong the complainant has suffered from the defendant, or a fault committed by some person against a law.

  29. 1853, Dickens|Charles Dickens, ''Bleak House'', ch 1:

  30. ... the legion of bills in the suit have been transformed into mere bills of mortality ...
  31. A piece of paper money; a banknote.

  32. (quote-book)

  33. (quote-book)So I wropped 'em up in a five dollar bill and tied 'em up and sent 'em, and they ain't back yet.”

  34. (quote-song)|artist=(w)|passage=I ran into the Devil, babe, he loaned me 20 bills.

  35. A written note of goods sold, services rendered, or work done, with the price or charge; an invoice.

  36. 1607, (w), ''(w)'', Act III, Scene IV, line 85.

  37. My lord, here is my bill.
  38. (senseid) A paper, written or printed, and posted up or given away, to advertise something, as a lecture, a play, or the sale of goods

  39. 1595, (w), ''(w)'', Act I, Scene II, line 104.

  40. In the meantime I will draw a bill of properties, such as our play wants.
  41. A writing binding the signer or signers to pay a certain sum at a future day or on demand, with or without interest, as may be stated in the document; a of exchange. In the United States, it is usually called a note, a note of hand, or a note.

  42. 1600, (w), ''(w)'', Act I, Scene I, line 8.

  43. Ay, and Rato-lorum too; and a gentleman born, Master Parson; who writes himself Armigero, in any bill, warrant, quittance, or obligation, Armigero.
  44. A set of items presented together.

  45. (quote-journal)

  46. To advertise by a bill or public notice.

  47. To charge; to send a bill to.

  48. 1989, Michelle Green, ''Understanding Health Insurance: A Guide to Billing and Reimbursement''

  49. The physician explains that this is an option for her and that she can sign the facility's ABN so that if Medicare denies the claim, the facility can bill her for the scan.
  50. The bell, or boom, of the bittern.

  51. 1793, (w), ''An Evening Walk''

  52. The bittern's hollow bill was heard.
  53. will (gl)

  54. wild, crazy, mad

  55. (l) (draft UK law)

  56. (l) (invoice in a restaurant etc)

  57. a share; the cutting blade of a plough

  58. a draft of a law in English-speaking countries